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JWT Authorization In A GraphQL API Using Golang

If you’ve been keeping up, you’ll remember I released a very popular tutorial titled, Getting Started with GraphQL Using Golang which was more or less a quick-start to using GraphQL in your web applications. Since then, I demonstrated an alternative way to work with related data in a tutorial titled, Maintain Data Relationships Through Resolvers with GraphQL in a Golang Application. Both articles are great, but they left out an important feature that most modern APIs must have. Most modern APIs must have a way to authorize particular users to access only certain pieces of data and not all data offered by the service.

One of the most popular ways to enforce some kind of authorization in an application is through the use of JSON web tokens (JWT). Users authenticate with a service and the service responds with a JWT to be used in every future request so that way the password is kept safe. The service can then validate the JWT to make sure it is correct and not expired.

We’re going to see how to protect particular GraphQL properties as well as entire queries using JSON web tokens and the Go programming language.

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Getting Started With GraphQL Development Using Node.js

I’ve been playing around with GraphQL for a little over a month now, just to see if it is worth all the buzz it has been getting when it comes to modern API development. I must say that the more I use it, the more I’m coming to like it.

I recently wrote a few tutorials around getting started with GraphQL using Golang, but being the polyglot that I am, I wanted to see how difficult it would be to accomplish the same in something else, like Node.js. After having made an attempt, I found that it really isn’t any different as it is the same concept, just a different language.

We’re going to see how to get started with developing a web application with Node.js that can be queried with GraphQL rather than the traditional RESTful API endpoint approach.

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Consume RESTful API Endpoints Within A Golang Application

I am a huge fan of the Go programming language and have written a decent amount of material on the subject. For example, a popular tutorial I wrote titled, Create a Simple RESTful API with Golang, focuses on developing an API. However, I recently received questions on the subject of consuming data from other APIs from within a Go application.

We’re going to see how to issue HTTP requests from within Go, in an effort to consume or send data to other RESTful APIs that might exist on the internet.

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Create A Simple RESTful API With Golang

Most modern applications have separation between the backend and the frontend layers. The backend is typically a RESTful API and is critical part of full stack development. These APIs are generally further broken down into a collection of routes, often referred to as endpoints. Building applications like this is often very clean and maintainable in comparison to mashing everything into a single application.

I have been creating RESTful APIs with a variety of programming languages, for example Node.js and Java, but lately I’ve been doing a lot of research on the Go programming language. It is fast and very solid programming language that every seems to be talking about. Because of this it only made sense to see what it took to build a RESTful API with Go, often referred to as Golang.

We’re going to see what it takes to build a simple API that does basic CRUD operations using the Go programming language.

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Make An AngularJS Library For The Imgur REST API

Imgur is a great image service for sharing and viewing images across the internet.

Since there is a lot of buzz around AngularJS lately and there isn’t already an AngularJS extension for the Imgur REST API, I decided to take it upon myself and start creating one.

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