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Share Internet Between macOS and a Raspberry Pi Zero Over USB

If you’re a fan of the Raspberry Pi, you might have stumbled upon my tutorial for interacting with a Raspberry Pi Zero using nothing more than a USB cable. If you recall, the standard Raspberry Pi Zero has no WiFi, no Bluetooth, and no Ethernet.

Alright, so let’s assume that you’re able to interact with your Raspberry Pi Zero. Now what? How do you update it, download new software, or work on some awesome projects that might require internet in some fashion?

Well, you could take a look at my tutorial titled, Three Simple Ways to get Online with a Raspberry Pi Zero IoT Device, or you could share the internet of your host computer without having to purchase any extra hardware.

In this tutorial we’re going to see how to share the internet from our host device, assuming that host is macOS.

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Monitoring GPS Data with the NEO 6M and Arduino

I recently wrote a tutorial titled, Configuring Visual Studio Code for Arduino Development, because I’ve been exploring the Internet of Things (IoT). Up until recently I’ve only had hands on experience with Raspberry Pi, but I’ve been expanding my knowledge with Arduino.

I have an Arduino Uno and a GPS module, so I thought it’d be a good idea to demonstrate how to use the two together.

In this tutorial we’re going to see how to monitor a NEO 6M GPS module connected to an Arduino using a few lines of very simple code.

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Configuring Visual Studio Code for Arduino Development

I’ve been playing around with an Arduino Uno recently, something new to me since I’ve always only used Raspberry Pi hardware. Many Arduino devices, or at least the Uno like I have are inexpensive and a lot of fun to play around with. However, the development experience out of the box isn’t exactly what I was familiar with or happy about. To develop and push code to an Arduino you need to use the Arduino Desktop IDE. If you’re like me, you’re a one IDE type of developer, so having to work in a different environment is a little less than ideal.

It doesn’t have to be that way when developing with Arduino though.

In this tutorial I’m going to walk you through configuring Visual Studio Code for Arduino development. You’ll be able to write code, deploy to hardware, and monitor the output.

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Continuous Integration With GitLab CI And Docker Using A Raspberry Pi

I know I’ve mentioned this before, but I’ve recently started to get serious about my content production and deployment approach on The Polyglot Developer. My goal is to be able to write my tutorials in Markdown, push to GitLab, and have it automatically deployed as a Docker container on my production server. Being able to automate things and take advantage of Docker will definitely improve my productivity in the long term.

So I’ve been playing around with tools on the subject, more specifically GitLab, because that is what I’m using to save a history of the blog. GitLab is a source code repository, but also a whole lot more given its ability to do continuous integration, continuous deployment, and work with Docker directly.

We’re going to take a look at installing GitLab and Docker on a Raspberry Pi, then configuring a GitLab CI Runner to take control of our continuous integration process every time we push some code. While it might sound easy, there are some certain things that aren’t so obvious in the setup and configuration.

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Writing Self Hosted Alexa Skills With Golang

A couple of years ago I was lucky enough to win an Echo Dot in a company hackathon. Since then I have been trying to develop Alexa Skills that interest me in my spare time. Before exploring this new field of development, I had been interested in learning and practicing a language that was new to me, Golang (or just Go). Considering Alexa skills are based on web services, one of the area where Go excels, it seemed like a great way to “have my cake and eat it too.”

It was a couple of months ago when I came across a great post by Nic Raboy on writing about writing Alexa Skills with Golang and AWS Lambda which can be found here. Most of the Skills I have developed started before Lambda had first-class support for Go so I am much more comfortable writing Skills using self-hosted web services. Using Lambda for Alexa Skills is definitely a great approach but there are some instances where using your own server might make more sense. If you are looking to reuse an existing server or rapidly prototype an idea then maybe it makes more sense to use this approach.

In this post, I will detail the steps necessary to deploy a web service that can be used to fulfill Alexa Skill requests. To make it easier to compare this approach with using Lambda, the functionality of the Skill will remain almost identical to Nic Raboy’s example. It is only the deployment process that will be changed.

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Building Amazon Alexa Skills With Node.js, Revisited

A little more than two years ago, when the Amazon Echo first started picking up steam and when I was first exposed to virtual assistants, I had written a tutorial around creating a Skill for Amazon Alexa using Node.js and simple JavaScript. In this tutorial titled, Create an Amazon Alexa Skill Using Node.js and AWS Lambda, we saw how to create intent functions and sample utterances in preparation for deployment on AWS Lambda. I later wrote a tutorial titled, Test Amazon Alexa Skills Offline with Mocha and Chai for Node.js, which focused on building unit tests for these Skills and their intent functions. Fast forward to now and a few things have changed in the realm of Skill development.

In this tutorial we’re going to see how to build a Skill for Alexa powered devices using Node.js and test it using popular frameworks and libraries such as Mocha and Chai.

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Build An Alexa Skill With Golang And AWS Lambda

It has been a few years since I last worked on and published an application, otherwise known as a Skill, for Alexa powered voice assistants. My last Skill titled, BART Control, was built out of necessity because of my commuting on the Bay Area Rapid Transit system. While I didn’t open source it, I had created the Skill with Node.js and a publicly available BART web service. Since then I had written a tutorial titled, Create an Amazon Alexa Skill Using Node.js and AWS Lambda, which also focused on Node.js.

I’m a huge fan of Golang and was pleased to see that AWS Lambda recently started to officially support it. AWS Lambda isn’t a requirement to creating Alexa Skills, but it is a huge convenience. To make things even better, Amazon recently sent me an invitation to take part in their developer offer to receive an Amazon Echo Show for publishing another Skill. The offer and Golang inspired me to develop another Skill and this time I wanted to share my process.

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